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Monday, June 1, 2009

Pan de Sal


I've had a couple people ask me, what is Pan de Sal or Pandesal? I've used it a couple of times on this blog like my Shroomwich and Garlic Bread recipes.

Pan de Sal is the Filipino version of the American dinner roll. You can read the history of this bread via Wikipedia: Pan de Sal. The literal translation means salt bread. When in fact, it's not even salty at all, but rather a little sweet. Not too sweet where it will taste like a cake. It's a really subtle sweetness. It has a nice tender crust with lots of chewy filling inside. It will be one of the softest bread you'll try. What also makes them a little distinctive is that they are dusted with breadcrumbs. I used panko crumbs because that's the only thing I had on hand, but any plain breadcrumbs would do or crumbs from the previous batch of pan de sal would be best.

Here in America, coffee and donuts go together. In the Philippines, coffee and pan de sal are the breakfast of choice when you're on the run. I used to eat these by themselves and did so until I started baking my own bread. Now I can go back to eating them again. Plus, the smell permeates through the entire house. It's a wonderful buttery scent. It's almost intoxicating. I adapted my french bread recipe to turn it into this Filipino treat. Most recipes I found turn out large batches, which would be too much for me, as much as I love my breads.

I made these around the size of a softball. Traditionally, they're smaller than a baseball. Toast them in the conventional oven or toaster-oven and they're great for sandwiches. You can also use a bread machine if you've got one. I, on the other hand, do the traditional way.

This will make 10 softball-sized rolls or 20 semi-baseball-sized rolls.




Pan de Sal

4 c All-Purpose Flour or bread flour
1 package of active dry yeast
6 Tbsp unsalted butter or olive oil
2 c lukewarm water (120˚F-130˚F)
6 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp salt
Olive oil
bread crumbs


Combine the yeast and water in a small bowl. Add a teaspoon of sugar and stir once. Let it sit for 5 min.

Combine the flour, remaining sugar, butter or olive oil and salt in a large bowl and add the yeast. Mix it all together until it form into a dough blob.

Remove from the bowl and on a well-floured flat surface, knead the dough for a good 8 min until it feels elastic.

Lightly oil another bowl, place the dough in it and cover with plastic wrap and a towel and place away from light. Roughly 1 1/2 to 2 hrs or until the dough doubles in size.

Lightly grease a baking sheet with olive oil or spray and sprinkle some breadcrumbs over them.

When the dough has doubled, punch down the dough to let the gases out and knead it again for a couple of minutes

Cut into 4 oz or 2 oz sized balls. (10 or 20)

Once all the dough balls are on the baking sheet, cover them again with plastic wrap and let it rest for about 1 hour or until double in size again.

Preheat oven to 375˚F

Remove the plastic wrap and sprinkle breadcrumbs over the rolls.

Bake in the oven: 15 min for large rolls. 10min for small rolls.

Note: to make wheat pan de sal, use 3 cups wheat flour with 1 cup all-purpose or bread flour.


33 comments:

MrsLavendula said...

this post reminds me of the time i tried to make pandesal and ended up with cookie-like pastries! hahaha! thanx for the post, the pandesal looks deliciously soft!

Donna-FFW said...

Ive never heard of this but It looks absolutely delicious and I could so see having this with coffee. Id love it for sure!

doggybloggy said...

I am loving the cultural influences lately - this looks like some mighty fine bread!

girlichef said...

Good baking...wow, these look amazing. I'm always envious of beautiful bread baking...

Chow and Chatter said...

looks delicious new to me also, needs jam inside he he

Netts Nook said...

I love these rolls always wondered how they were made thanks for sharing.

5 Star Foodie said...

These look wonderful! I would love one with my coffee right now!

the ungourmet said...

I have had this and it is delicious! Yours looks so light and tasty. The smell of bread baking is one of my favorite things on earth!

Sweta said...

Looks very soft inside-perfect with a hot cuppa tea!

OysterCulture said...

what wonderful, simple rolls, they look delicious!

Elra said...

JENN, you are talented indeed. Beautiful crumb!

Jen @ MyKitchenAddiction.com said...

Looks delicious! I think I will try making the whole wheat version!

Reeni♥ said...

They look perfect! Soft and fluffy and so yummy!

Nila Rosa said...

Don't forget the star margarine! MMMM

Kelly said...

Yum! Yum, yum, yum! That looks so nice. The crumb is GEORGEOUS!!

The Duo Dishes said...

You can't go wrong by giving us bread.

Pam said...

They look so fluffy and perfectly baked. Oh how I wish I had a few of them slathered with butter right now.

Jenn said...

MrsLavendula: Cookies are great too.

Donna: I'm sure you will, too.

doggy: I'm in the motherland state-of-mind lately.

girlichef: Thanks.

chow and chatter: You can definitely spread some jam in this.

Netts Nook: No Problem. =)

5 Star Foodie: So would I.

the ungourmet: The smell of fresh bread is amazing.

Sweta: Tea is good with this too.

OysterCulture: =)

Elra: Thank you very much.

Jen: The wheat version is also great.

Reeni: I think the soft and chewyness it the winner.

Nila Rosa: Yes, I must not. Ironically I had some Star Margarine on my pandesal this morning. LOL.

Kelly: It very delish, indeed.

Duo Dishes: Bread never fails to please.

Pam: =)

Diana said...

I think I'd much prefer pan de sal with my coffee than a donut! Especially if said pan de sal was spread with something peanut butter or jam like...

Jenn said...

Diana: Good. =)

Justin said...

wow, i never thought of making these because they're only $1/bag at my local place. did you see when I wrote about that... not sure if you had ever visited my blog back then. might have to try your recipe

Jenn said...

Justin: I don't think I have. I'll have to look it up. =)

lisaiscooking said...

They look delicious! I'd love to try a warm pan de sal with coffee for breakfast.

Elyse said...

Yum! These look so much better than American dinner rolls. I can only imagine how awesome they smell when they're baking. Delish!

Jenn said...

Lisaiscooking: =)

Elyse: The smell it to die for!

Tangled Noodle said...

I'm sipping coffee right now and after reading this and looking at the photos of your perfect little pandesals, it just doesn't seem complete! AAAArrrrgggh! I have class in 2 hours - not enough time to whip up a batch. Guess I'll have to wait until tomorrow but my classmates are in for a moody Noodle today.

Jenn said...

Tangled Noodle: It's definitely work to take the time to make it.

The Food Addicts said...

the bread looks so moist! i love making bread because the entire house smells great. awesome recipe!

Jenn said...

The Food Addicts: Thanks.

Midge said...

Hi, is it possible to create a gluten-free and refined sugar-free version of pan de sal without vastly altering its texture?

Jenn said...

Midge: I'm sure a gluten-free and sugar-free recipe would be fine. The butter is what makes the texture really what it is. Sure just adds the sweetness flavor, but can be omitted.

Mewsings said...

Hi Jenn, was looking for a simple pan de sal recipe and thanks to you seem to have one that is relatively easy. do you mind advising what yeast you got. the yeast i got apparently does not require water as the sachet stated it can be added to the flour directly. followed the recipe but ended up with something gooey instead of a blob so we kept adding flour, hehehe. Can i just omit the water? thanks so much for sharing the recipe.

Jenn said...

Mewsings: Thanks for stopping by. The brand of yeast I use is Fleischmann's. They have two kinds Active Dry Yeast (105-120˚ water) and Rapid Rise Yeast (120-130˚ water). The second one can be add to the flour mixture directly, Which I like to use as it slightly speeds up rising time. But I always mix them in the water first with a little bit of sugar, so that I know they're "alive." I wouldn't recommend omitting the water because that is the binding agent. The butter is mostly for texture purposes. Hope this helps.

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